Ann Louise Bardach

Ann Louise Bardach

Ann Louise Bardach has written for virtually all the major media in the U.S. and the U.K. – the New York Times, the Washington PostPOLITICO, the Wall Street Journal’s Magazine, the Los Angeles TimesThe New YorkerThe AtlanticSlateThe Guardian, the Financial TimesThe New RepublicNewsweek/The Daily Beast as Writer-at-Large and Vanity Fair, where she was a reporter for a decade. The Columbia Journalism Review has called her “the go-to journalist on all things Cuban and Miami.”

A prize-winning author and journalist, she has covered an eclectic range of political and cultural issues – from crime reporting to U.S. elections to matters of faith to the nature of celebrity, not to mention the life of the Indian saint, Vivekananda.

She is the author of Without Fidel: A Death Foretold in Miami, Havana and Washington and Cuba Confidential: Love and Vengeance in Miami and Havana, as well as the editor of The Prison Letters of Fidel Castro and Cuba: A Travelers Literary Companion and served on The Brookings Institution’s Cuba Study Project.  Her book Cuba Confidential was a finalist for the New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Award for Excellence in Journalism and the PEN USA Award for Best Nonfiction, and named one of Ten Best Books of 2002 by the Los Angeles Times.  In 1995, she won the PEN USA Award for Best Journalism for her reporting on Mexico in Vanity Fair magazine. Another year, her Vanity Fair coverage of the impact of Islamic fundamentalism in the West was a finalist for the PEN USA Journalism Award.

An intrepid reporter known for securing hard-to-get admissions from Fidel Castro to E. Howard Hunt, she has interviewed several dozen U.S. and world leaders and personalities. She is frequently seen and heard on television and radio and has appeared on 60 Minutes, The Today Show, Good Morning America, Dateline, CNN, Nightline, The O’Reilly Factor, Charlie Rose, National Public Radio and PRI’s Marketplace. She created and wrote the Global Buzz column for Newsweek International and the Interrogation column for Slate.

She started the Global Journalism class at University of California at Santa Barbara and is on the board UCSB’s Carsey-Wolf Center for Film, Television and New Media, also NPR’s KCRW in Santa Barbara, and was a Resident Scholar with the Orfalea Center at UCSB. Several of her articles have been anthologized in KILLED: Journalism Too Hot To Print and Mexico in Mind (Vintage).

CV INK. http://bardachreports.com/contact.html


Wade Davis

Wade Davis

Wade Davis is Professor of Anthropology and the BC Leadership Chair in Cultures and Ecosystems at Risk at the University of British Columbia. Between 1999 and 2013 he served as Explorer-in-Residence at the National Geographic Society and is currently a member of the NGS Explorers Council and Honorary Vice-President of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. Named by the NGS as one of the Explorers for the Millennium, he has been described as “a rare combination of scientist, scholar, poet and passionate defender of all of life’s diversity.” In 2014 Switzerland’s leading think tank, the Gottlieb Duttweiler Institute of Zurich, ranked him 16th in their annual survey of the top 100 most influential global Thought Leaders.

An ethnographer, writer, photographer and filmmaker, Davis holds degrees in anthropology and biology and received his Ph.D. in ethnobotany, all from Harvard University. Mostly through the Harvard Botanical Museum, he spent over three years in the Amazon and Andes as a plant explorer, living among fifteen indigenous groups in eight Latin American nations while making some 6000 botanical collections. His work later took him to Haiti to investigate folk preparations implicated in the creation of zombies, an assignment that led to his writing The Serpent and the Rainbow (1986), an international best seller later released by Universal as a motion picture. In recent years his work has taken him to East Africa, Borneo, Nepal, Peru, Polynesia, Tibet, Mali, Benin, Togo, New Guinea, Australia, Colombia, Vanuatu, Mongolia and the high Arctic of Nunuvut and Greenland.

Davis is the author of 280 scientific and popular articles and 20 books including One River (1996), The Wayfinders (2009), The Sacred Headwaters (2011), Into the Silence (2011) and River Notes (2012). His photographs have been widely exhibited and have appeared in 30 books and 100 magazines, including National Geographic, Time, Geo, People, Men’s Journal, and Outside. He was the co-curator of The Lost Amazon: The Photographic Journey of Richard Evans Schultes, first exhibited at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. In 2012 he served as guest curator of No Strangers: Ancient Wisdom in the Modern World, an exhibit at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles.

His many film credits include Light at the Edge of the World, an eight-hour documentary series written and produced for the National Geographic. A professional speaker for 30 years, Davis has lectured at over 200 universities and 250 corporations and professional associations. In 2009 he delivered the CBC Massey Lectures. He has spoken from the main stage at TED five times, and his three posted talks have been viewed by 4 million. His books have appeared in 20 languages and sold approximately one million copies.

Davis is the recipient of 11 honorary degrees, as well as the 2009 Gold Medal from the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, the 2011 Explorers Medal, the highest award of the Explorers Club, the 2012 David Fairchild Medal for botanical exploration, the 2013 Ness Medal for geography education from the Royal Geographical Society, the 2015 Centennial Medal of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, and the 2017 Roy Chapman Andrews Society Distinguished Explorer Award. His book, Into the Silence, received the 2012 Samuel Johnson prize, the top award for literary nonfiction in the English language. In 2016 he was made a Member of the Order of Canada.


Scott Evers

Scott Evers

Scott Evers is an award winning writer and director of documentary films. He is the recipient of the George Foster Peabody Award and Emmys for films on America’s social ills of youth violence, poverty, and HIV/AIDS. He is the founder of the Amitist Organization, a coalition focused on media campaigns to educate youth for health and wellbeing.

Scott’s current work includes countering messages of violent extremism and radicalization in the United States and the United Kingdom.


Niall Ferguson

Niall Ferguson

Niall Ferguson, MA, D.Phil., is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a senior fellow of the Center for European Studies, Harvard, where he served for twelve years as the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History. He is also a visiting professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing, and the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation Distinguished Scholar at the Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, DC.

He is the author of fourteen books, most recently Kissinger, 1923-1968: The Idealist, which won the Council on Foreign Relations Arthur Ross Prize. He is an award-making filmmaker, too, having won an international Emmy for his PBS series The Ascent of Money. His many other prizes include the Benjamin Franklin Prize for Public Service (2010), the Hayek Prize for Lifetime Achievement (2012) and the Ludwig Erhard Prize for Economic Journalism (2013). He writes a weekly column for the Sunday Times (London) and the Boston Globe. His new book, The Square and the Tower, will be published in January 2018.


Jeff Greenfield

Jeff Greenfield

Jeff Greenfield, a veteran political, media and culture reporter and analyst, has spent more than thirty years on network television, while also working as a print journalist and best-selling author. In his 30+ plus years at CBS, CNN, ABC, and PBS, he has reported on matters political and cultural. Among other roles, he served as its lead analyst for primaries, conventions, presidential debates and election nights, as well as presidential funerals and Supreme Court confirmation hearings. Greenfield also has reported on the media, culture and trends for the cable network. He is currently a columnist for The Daily Beast and POLITICO and a contributing correspondent for PBS’ “Newshour”.

Though the five-time Emmy winner’s reporting has taken him to locales around the world from South Africa, to Japan, to Europe, he is principally known for his coverage of domestic politics and media. He has served as a floor reporter or anchor booth analyst for every national convention since 1988. He has twice been named to TV Guide’s All-Star team as best political commentator and was cited by the Washington Journalism Review as “the best in the business” for his media analysis.

Before joining CNN, Greenfield was a political and media analyst for ABC News (1983-97), appearing primarily on Nightline and delivering weekly commentaries for World News Sunday.

Previously, he was the media commentator for CBS News (1979-83). Greenfield has also appeared on William F. Buckley’s Firing Line and PBS’ We Interrupt This Week. He was the anchor of PBS’ CEO Exchange, a limited-run series, for five seasons.

Greenfield, a native of New York City, graduated with honors from the University of Wisconsin, where he was Editor-in-Chief of The Daily Cardinal. He is an honors graduate of Yale Law School, where he was a Note and Comment Editor of the Yale Law Journal.

Following law school, Greenfield worked as a speechwriter in the Senate ODIC and 1968 Presidential campaign of Robert Kennedy. He then worked as Chief Speechwriter for New York City Mayor John Lindsay.

Greenfield spent seven years with famed political consultant David Garth, and wrote books and magazine articles as well—his work has appeared in magazines ranging from The New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, and Esquire to The National Lampoon.

For fifteen years, he was a syndicated columnist whose Universal Press Syndicate Columns appeared in more than 150 newspapers. He has also served as columnist for TIME Magazine, Yahoo! News and—currently—for The Daily Beast.

Greenfield has authored or co-authored 13 books, including national bestselling novel The People’s Choice, The Real Campaign and Oh, Waiter! One Order of Crow! an insider account of the contested 2000 presidential election. His latest book Then Everything Changed: Stunning Alternate Histories of American Politics — JFK, RFK, Carter, Ford, Reagan, which was released to great acclaim in March 2011. A follow-up e-book, 43*: When Gore Beat Bush – A Political Fable, in September 2012, and his latest, If Kennedy Lived: The First and Second Terms of President John F. Kennedy: An Alternate History, was published in 2013.

Greenfield lives with his wife, Dena Sklar, in Santa Barbara, California and New York City. He has two grown children and five grandchildren.


Casey Grover

Casey Grover

Casey A. Grover, MD. is a Monterey native, born and raised on the Monterey Peninsula. He attended medical school at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and then trained in Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University/Kaiser Permanente combined program. Dr. Grover developed a passion for complex care management and substance abuse in medical school, which has continued in his current position as an Emergency Physician at Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula. He has performed several research studies on addiction, medication abuse, and over-use of Emergency Departments, with publications most notably in the New England Journal of Medicine, Annals of Emergency Medicine, The Journal of Emergency Medicine, and the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine. He is the director of the hospital’s Emergency Department care management program as well as the Physician Champion of the Monterey County Prescribe Safe Initiative – Monterey County’s prescription drug safety program.

More information about Dr. Grover’s work fighting back against the opioid epidemic with the Monterey County Prescribe Safe Initiative is available at: http://www.chomp.org/prescribe-safe/


Scott James

Scott James

Scott James is an author and veteran journalist, best known for his stories in The New York Times.

He has received three Emmy awards for his work in television news, and is also the author of two bestselling novels, “SoMa” and “The Sower,” which he wrote under the pen name Kemble Scott.

He’s currently at work on a new non-fiction book about one of America’s deadliest tragedies.


Steven Johnson

Steven Johnson

Steven Johnson is the author of ten books on the history of science, technology, and innovation. His writings have influenced everything from cutting-edge ideas in urban planning to the battle against 21st-century terrorism. Johnson was chosen by Prospect magazine as one of the top ten brains of the digital future, and The Wall Street Journal called him “one of the most persuasive advocates for the role of collaboration in innovation.”

Johnson’s work on the history of innovation led to his Emmy-nominated six-part series on PBS, “How We Got To Now with Steven Johnson,” which aired in the fall of 2014. The book version of How We Got To Now was a finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. His new book, Wonderland: How Play Made the Modern World, revolves around the creative power of play and delight: ideas and innovations that set into motion many momentous changes in science, technology, politics and society.

Johnson is also the author of the bestselling Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation. Others include The Invention of Air, The Ghost Map, and Everything Bad Is Good For You. He lives in Brooklyn, NY and Marin County, CA with his wife and three sons.


Jeff Kirschner

Jeff Kirschner

When his 4-year old daughter saw a plastic tub of cat litter in the woods, little did Jeff Kirschner realize that it would be the spark for creating Litterati – a worldwide movement that’s “crowdsource-cleaning” the planet one piece of litter at a time. Featured by National Geographic, Time Magazine, and Fast Company, Jeff has spoken at Fortune 500 companies such as Google, Facebook, and eBay, keynoted environmental summits at the Monterey Bay Aquarium and Smithsonian, as well as leading universities including Stanford, Berkeley, MIT, and the University of Michigan. Jeff was recently a TED Resident where his TED Talk gained international recognition.

MORE INFO: www.litterati.org


Scott Klemmer

Scott Klemmer

Scott Klemmer is a Professor of Cognitive Science and Computer Science & Engineering at UC San Diego, where he co-founded the Design Lab. He previously served as Associate Professor of Computer Science at Stanford, where he co-directed the HCI Group, held the Bredt Faculty Scholar chair, and was a founding participant in the d.school. He has a dual BA in Art-Semiotics and Computer Science from Brown (with Graphic Design work at RISD), and a PhD in CS from Berkeley.

His former graduate students are leading professors (at Berkeley, CMU, UCSD, & UIUC), researchers (Google & Adobe), founders (including Instagram & Pulse), social entrepreneurs, and engineers. He helped introduce peer assessment to online education, and created the first such online course. More than 200,000 have signed up for his interaction design class & specialization. He has been awarded the Katayanagi Emerging Leadership Prize, Sloan Fellowship, NSF CAREER award, and Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellowship. Nine of his papers were awarded best paper or honorable mention at top HCI venues. He is on the editorial board of HCI and TOCHI; was program co-chair for UIST, the CHI systems area, and HCIC; and serves on the Learning at Scale steering committee. He advises university design programs globally. Organizations worldwide use his group’s open-source design tools and curricula.